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By CCW Staff  /  
2009 September 21 - 12:00 am

NEWS BRIEFS:

  • Former Ala. Legislator Schmitz Appealing Fraud Conviction

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Former state Rep. Sue Schmitz is appealing her federal fraud conviction to the 11th U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta.

Federal court records show Schmitz’ notice of appeal was officially filed with the 11th Circuit.

The 64-year-old Schmitz has been sentenced to 2½ years in prison for her conviction on charges she used her political influence to obtain a job with Alabama’s two-year college system and then did little work.

The Democrat automatically forfeited her position as a state representative when she was convicted.

Federal prosecutors, meanwhile, have filed a motion seeking to seize seven bank accounts held by Schmitz.

Prosecutors said Schmitz owes the government $177,951. That’s the amount prosecutors say she received from the job in the two-year college system.

  • College Student In Iowa Dies After Climbing Turbine

ESTHERVILLE, Iowa (AP) — A student at a northern Iowa community college has died after losing consciousness during a climb up a wind turbine.

Robert May, 59, was enrolled in the wind energy and turbine technology program at Iowa Lakes Community College. On his second day as a student, May lost consciousness while ascending the turbine. Staff and students quickly administered CPR, but May died at a local hospital.

May had been laid off from a Maytag plant and was seeking new skills, college officials said.

College president Valerie Newhouse expressed sadness at the death and thanked students, staff and emergency workers for a quick response.

  • Missouri Town Offers Land for College Campus

JACKSON, Mo. (AP) — The southeast Missouri town of Jackson is hoping to lure Three Rivers Community College to open a campus there by offering 15 acres of land to the college.

Aldermen approved the donation last month. Mayor Barbara Lohr told the Southeast Missourian newspaper that the city first contacted Three Rivers two years ago in an effort to bring a campus to Jackson.

Since then, a needs analysis has determined a demand for additional higher education opportunities in the area. Jackson is near Cape Girardeau and about 100 miles south of St. Louis.

Southeast Missouri State and Mineral Area College have made a joint proposal to open a higher education center in Cape Girardeau by next fall.

  • Mississippi CC Sets Record Enrollment

BOONEVILLE, Miss. (AP) — Enrollment at Northeast Mississippi Community College has reached a record high this fall.

College officials believe the achievement was fueled by increased recruiting efforts and a difficult economy that has caused many people to reevaluate their need for higher education.

The college had 3,707 students enrolled when registration ended for the current semester. This marks a 275 student increase over the previous record set in the fall of 2007 and a 405 student boost over last year’s figure.

NEMCC President Johnny Allen said it’s impossible to attribute the rise in enrollment to any single factor, but he believes the college’s efforts to recruit more students have played a major role.

  • Ky. College Offers Free Training For Paramedics

HARLAN, Ky. (AP) — Officials in southeastern Kentucky are offering free training, hoping to boost the number of paramedics in the area.

Harlan County Emergency Management Director David McGill tells the Harlan Daily Enterprise that there is a shortage of paramedics in southeast Kentucky.

The training will be offered to qualified Emergency Medical Technicians at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College’s campuses in Harlan and Bell counties. Paramedics are generally the most highly trained emergency medical responders, able to administer more drugs and perform more advanced medical procedures than an EMT.

The 16-month course will include clinical and ride time, lectures and laboratory work, and field work with ambulance services.

  • Scholarship To Honor Slain Ill. Professor

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (AP) — A slain central Illinois community college professor will be honored with an art scholarship.

Heartland Community College in Bloomington has announced it will set up the art scholarship in memory of 57-year-old Joseph McCauley, who was found dead in his home on Aug. 21.

According to the school’s website, the scholarship “will be a lasting reminder of Professor McCauley’s love of art and dedication to students.”

McCauley’s 20-year-old son, Liam McCauley, has been charged with three counts of murder in his father’s death. His bond was set at $1 million. An autopsy showed Joseph McCauley died of multiple stab wounds and blunt force injuries to the head.

McCauley taught at the school for 18 years.

  • Smoking Ban Due To Extend Off Calif. Campus

SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — People smoking outside Santa Rosa Junior College would be fined up to $500 under an ordinance being considered by the City Council.

There is already a smoking ban on campus as well as a city ordinance that prohibits smoking within 20 feet of designated nonsmoking areas. School trustees have approved a plan that would allow campus officers to enforce the city ordinance outside college property.

  • Mich. Colleges To Allow 3-Year Credit Transfer

YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) — Some Mott Community College students will be able to apply more than three years worth of credits to a four-year degree at Eastern Michigan University.

The credit transfer agreement lets students earn up to 94 credits at Flint-based Mott and apply them toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing or technology management at Ypsilanti-based Eastern Michigan.

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