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2012 December 10 - 12:00 am

NEWS BRIEFS:

  • Ky. College’s Plans Seen as Economic Boon

COVINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A northern Kentucky community college is investing an ambitious $81.5 million into a new urban campus in the hopes it will become the foundation for urban economic development in Covington.

The new Gateway Community & Technical College campus itself will be nestled in roughly a six-block area in Covington’s Central Business District.

Gateway buildings and partnerships are expected to spread throughout northern Kentucky’s largest city, filling up long-vacant storefronts and bringing new foot traffic for existing businesses — and, hopefully, new ones.

Ed Hughes, Gateway’s president, said the location not only will give students the best educational experience but will also provide the greatest economic impact on the city. The urban campus is a critical part of the Center City Action Plan to revitalize the central business district and surrounding neighborhoods.

Over the past year city officials have worked aggressively to lay the groundwork for a new economic development boom in Covington.

The announcement that Gateway is moving aggressively on the urban campus is expected to generate significant momentum to continue and sustain those efforts.

“This is truly going to be transformational for the urban core,” said Mayor Chuck Scheper. “There’s a new energy, there’s a new enthusiasm, there’s a new appreciation for `We can do this. We can move this city forward.”

  • Mont. Colleges Work To Attract Adult Students

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Two-year colleges must continue working to attract adult students while also making sure it’s known the schools are affiliated with the Montana University System, the Montana Board of Regents has been told.

John Cech, deputy commissioner for two-year and community college education with the Montana University System, said it’s important to bring in adults, veterans and high school graduates into the state’s postsecondary system.

“One of our best opportunities to do that will be through the kind of programs found at our two-year campuses,” Cech said. “For a decade now, the board has been emphasizing two-year education and putting a spotlight on it.”

One school making changes is City College of Montana State University-Billings.

Rolf Groseth, the school’s chancellor, said the school is looking to create new pathways for students to earn their credentials, or work more closely with industry.

“It’s not quite like an internship, but rather, it’s more of a European model, working with industry to produce workers for them,” said Groseth. “We and Great Falls College are working with industries in our communities, like welding and fitting, to achieve some of those areas.”

  • SC Presidents, Agency Heads Get Pay Raises

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina legislative panel has approved giving state agency directors and college presidents their first state-provided raise in five years.

The Agency Head Salary Commission voted to give directors and technical college presidents a 7 percent salary increase. The panel approved 8 percent raises for presidents of four-year public colleges.

Tom Hatfield, one of the panel’s three non-lawmakers, voted against all three proposals. Republican Rep. Mike Pitts voted against the 8 percent raises.

Budget and Control Board spokeswoman Lindsey Krimlick says the raises are the first approved by the panel since 2007.

Legislators gave most state employees 3 percent raises in the current budget, 5 percent for state law enforcement officers earning less than $50,000. Those were the first raises in four years for state employees.

  • Pima CC Moves Public-Input Part Of Meetings

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Pima Community College has moved the public input segment of its board meetings from the start of the proceeding to at or near the end.

The Arizona Daily Star reports that the change makes Pima Community College the only community college in Arizona that makes people sit through a meeting before making comments.

Board chairman Scott Stewart says he arranged the change because he thinks commenters need to hear more about what the college is doing, rather than just leave as they now often do when they’re done speaking.

But some observers see the move as an attempt to curtail criticism of the college.

The school has been in the spotlight for months over questionable spending and procurement practices and sexual harassment allegations against former Chancellor Roy Flores, who stepped down in June.

  • Missouri College Prez To Take Arkansas Job

MOBERLY, Mo. (AP) — The president of Moberly Area Community College will become the new president of a community college in Bentonville, Ark.

Evelyn Jorgenson said she will leave the Moberly school at the end of this academic year. She’ll start her new job at Northwest Arkansas Community College on July 1.

Jorgenson has been president of the Moberly school of 16 years. In that time, the school constructed several new buildings, including the Graphic Arts/Fine Arts Center, the McCormick Commons and the Residential Center. The college also is planning a new facility in Hannibal.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the school started study abroad and online degree programs during Jorgenson’s tenure.

  • Maine College Offers Early-Morning Classes

SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — School bells will ring extra early at Southern Maine Community College next semester.

The South Portland school will offer 10 early-morning classes in the spring 2013 semester, with start times of 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m.

The college says the added flexibility in the schedule is designed to serve two purposes. It will provide more options for the college’s increasingly diverse student population, many of whom are working professionals or have family demands.

The change will also help to ease traffic congestion on Broadway, the main South Portland artery to SMCC, during the morning commute.

  • Lt. Gov. Prods Ill. Lawmakers On Affordability

DEKALB, Ill. (AP) — Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon is urging lawmakers and education officials to help keep college affordable.

Simon spoke during a tour of Northern Illinois University and called a college degree a prerequisite for students to get jobs that pay well. She says a college-educated workforce also will help Illinois attract high-wage, high-skill jobs.

The College Board estimated costs at public and private universities nationwide rose more than 4 percent this school year. The cost of community college increased more than 5 percent.

Simon says lawmakers should make the tuition tax credit known as the American Opportunity Tax Credit permanent. It’s scheduled to expire at the end of the year.

She also says state Monetary Award Program grants should be awarded based on financial need, rather than on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Former Va. First Lady Gets Job With Colleges

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Former Virginia first lady Anne Holton says she’s looking forward to her new job with an education initiative.

Holton, who is married to former Gov. Tim Kaine, will become program director of Great Expectations in January. The Virginia Community College System initiative helps young people who are aging out of foster care continue their education.

Holton tells the Richmond Times-Dispatch that she was looking for an opportunity to work directly with at-risk youths when she learned about the job.

The program operates at 16 of the state’s 23 community colleges. Holton says part of her job will be to expand the program to other campuses.

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  • Ky. College’s Plans Seen as Economic Boon

COVINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A northern Kentucky community college is investing an ambitious $81.5 million into a new urban campus in the hopes it will become the foundation for urban economic development in Covington.

The new Gateway Community & Technical College campus itself will be nestled in roughly a six-block area in Covington’s Central Business District.

Gateway buildings and partnerships are expected to spread throughout northern Kentucky’s largest city, filling up long-vacant storefronts and bringing new foot traffic for existing businesses — and, hopefully, new ones.

Ed Hughes, Gateway’s president, said the location not only will give students the best educational experience but will also provide the greatest economic impact on the city. The urban campus is a critical part of the Center City Action Plan to revitalize the central business district and surrounding neighborhoods.

Over the past year city officials have worked aggressively to lay the groundwork for a new economic development boom in Covington.

The announcement that Gateway is moving aggressively on the urban campus is expected to generate significant momentum to continue and sustain those efforts.

“This is truly going to be transformational for the urban core,” said Mayor Chuck Scheper. “There’s a new energy, there’s a new enthusiasm, there’s a new appreciation for `We can do this. We can move this city forward.”

  • Mont. Colleges Work To Attract Adult Students

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Two-year colleges must continue working to attract adult students while also making sure it’s known the schools are affiliated with the Montana University System, the Montana Board of Regents has been told.

John Cech, deputy commissioner for two-year and community college education with the Montana University System, said it’s important to bring in adults, veterans and high school graduates into the state’s postsecondary system.

“One of our best opportunities to do that will be through the kind of programs found at our two-year campuses,” Cech said. “For a decade now, the board has been emphasizing two-year education and putting a spotlight on it.”

One school making changes is City College of Montana State University-Billings.

Rolf Groseth, the school’s chancellor, said the school is looking to create new pathways for students to earn their credentials, or work more closely with industry.

“It’s not quite like an internship, but rather, it’s more of a European model, working with industry to produce workers for them,” said Groseth. “We and Great Falls College are working with industries in our communities, like welding and fitting, to achieve some of those areas.”

  • SC Presidents, Agency Heads Get Pay Raises

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina legislative panel has approved giving state agency directors and college presidents their first state-provided raise in five years.

The Agency Head Salary Commission voted to give directors and technical college presidents a 7 percent salary increase. The panel approved 8 percent raises for presidents of four-year public colleges.

Tom Hatfield, one of the panel’s three non-lawmakers, voted against all three proposals. Republican Rep. Mike Pitts voted against the 8 percent raises.

Budget and Control Board spokeswoman Lindsey Krimlick says the raises are the first approved by the panel since 2007.

Legislators gave most state employees 3 percent raises in the current budget, 5 percent for state law enforcement officers earning less than $50,000. Those were the first raises in four years for state employees.

  • Pima CC Moves Public-Input Part Of Meetings

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Pima Community College has moved the public input segment of its board meetings from the start of the proceeding to at or near the end.

The Arizona Daily Star reports that the change makes Pima Community College the only community college in Arizona that makes people sit through a meeting before making comments.

Board chairman Scott Stewart says he arranged the change because he thinks commenters need to hear more about what the college is doing, rather than just leave as they now often do when they’re done speaking.

But some observers see the move as an attempt to curtail criticism of the college.

The school has been in the spotlight for months over questionable spending and procurement practices and sexual harassment allegations against former Chancellor Roy Flores, who stepped down in June.

  • Missouri College Prez To Take Arkansas Job

MOBERLY, Mo. (AP) — The president of Moberly Area Community College will become the new president of a community college in Bentonville, Ark.

Evelyn Jorgenson said she will leave the Moberly school at the end of this academic year. She’ll start her new job at Northwest Arkansas Community College on July 1.

Jorgenson has been president of the Moberly school of 16 years. In that time, the school constructed several new buildings, including the Graphic Arts/Fine Arts Center, the McCormick Commons and the Residential Center. The college also is planning a new facility in Hannibal.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports the school started study abroad and online degree programs during Jorgenson’s tenure.

  • Maine College Offers Early-Morning Classes

SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — School bells will ring extra early at Southern Maine Community College next semester.

The South Portland school will offer 10 early-morning classes in the spring 2013 semester, with start times of 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m.

The college says the added flexibility in the schedule is designed to serve two purposes. It will provide more options for the college’s increasingly diverse student population, many of whom are working professionals or have family demands.

The change will also help to ease traffic congestion on Broadway, the main South Portland artery to SMCC, during the morning commute.

  • Lt. Gov. Prods Ill. Lawmakers On Affordability

DEKALB, Ill. (AP) — Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon is urging lawmakers and education officials to help keep college affordable.

Simon spoke during a tour of Northern Illinois University and called a college degree a prerequisite for students to get jobs that pay well. She says a college-educated workforce also will help Illinois attract high-wage, high-skill jobs.

The College Board estimated costs at public and private universities nationwide rose more than 4 percent this school year. The cost of community college increased more than 5 percent.

Simon says lawmakers should make the tuition tax credit known as the American Opportunity Tax Credit permanent. It’s scheduled to expire at the end of the year.

She also says state Monetary Award Program grants should be awarded based on financial need, rather than on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Former Va. First Lady Gets Job With Colleges

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Former Virginia first lady Anne Holton says she’s looking forward to her new job with an education initiative.

Holton, who is married to former Gov. Tim Kaine, will become program director of Great Expectations in January. The Virginia Community College System initiative helps young people who are aging out of foster care continue their education.

Holton tells the Richmond Times-Dispatch that she was looking for an opportunity to work directly with at-risk youths when she learned about the job.

The program operates at 16 of the state’s 23 community colleges. Holton says part of her job will be to expand the program to other campuses.

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